Roasting Guide

Roasting Assistance

Never roasted before?  No problem!  We'll teach you how!  You'll be an expert in about 5 roasts!  After your purchase, for your first roast, we'll walk you through the entire first roast so that you get the hang of it quick!  If you have any questions afterwards, we'll be around to help you out there.  Your roasts should always be simply spectacular, the best coffee you have ever tasted, if for some reason it isn't that way, then let's talk about it and we'll offer some suggestions to get people knocking down your door to get at your coffee!  For a good start read the guide below, or feel free to call or email.

Take a look at the video tutorials on the RK Roast process that should give you a great idea on how to roast providing as many visual cues as we can show you.  This will document the roast process from start to finish and will show you how we do it.

A. The Art of Coffee Roasting

Coffee roasting really is simply an art form.  Nothing is more true of this than when you roast on the RK.  The reason for this is that you don't have any computer controls or any automation to roast for you.  With this form of roasting, you will become a true expert of the trade very quickly as we roast entirely with sights, smells, sounds, temperatures and times.  What I will document here is what works for us and what seems to work really well for most of our customers.  Undoubtedly there will be someone who will say that roasting should be done this way or that and you'll get better roasts if you do this or that.

That is simply the beauty of coffee roasting.  Every coffee roasts differently, has an ideal roast temperature, and even a roast time.  The quality of the coffee you choose will determine the ultimate perfection of a coffee.  Conversely, you can ruin a near perfect green coffee by roasting it incorrectly.

A Colombian coffee may have an optimum roast at Full City and a particular Salvadoran coffee may not be too great at Full City, but begins to really shine at Full City +.

So if you truly wish to master the art of coffee roasting, then you really should study each individual coffee that you buy, and understand to what degree the coffee should be roasted in order to achieve maximum flavor in that given coffee.  Tom Owen at Sweetmarias.com has a database of coffees and what their ideal roast should be and should serve as an excellent reference as to what you should try for on your roasts.

I, personally, have only scratched the surface in obtaining excellence in coffee roasting.  And will always be learning. I once had a conversation with someone whom I consider an expert in coffee and he told me that even after 20 years, he is still learning new things about coffee every day...

I suppose I have a long way to go and a lot to learn even now.

B. Suggestions for New Roasters

Now I'm sure someone out there will want to burn me at the stake for taking this angle.  I suppose I am a bit of a practicalist and frankly have entirely more to do on a daily basis than what the average person should have.  I basically run 3 businesses and have a family too.  As much as I would like, I just don't have the time in the day to be ultra-focused on the art of roasting like some folks do.  I'll just settle for happy customers, repeat orders and real good coffee.  If you have the time to become a top-notch expert on roasting, then I am truly envious of your skill and dedication and sincerely, we need people like you to teach the rest of us how to roast better and to perfect the art and tradition of excellence in coffee roasting.

Personally, however, I find that just about no matter how I roast, or for that matter, what coffee I roast, my customers are just flat out obsessed with the coffee that I give them.

I suppose that is a testament to the excellence of Ron's drum design.  It just works very well on any coffee, and roasts as well, or better, than the really expensive commercial roasters.

The reason that I tell you this, is that particularly if you are new to coffee roasting, then you simply don't need to be afraid of roasting, or producing bad coffee.  The system is very forgiving and in my opinion, you actually have to work at it to make bad coffee.

In my experience, the vast majority of Americans are simply accustomed to drinking Folgers and other low quality brands.  They drink it because it is cheap.  Even the national brand that you see hocking $4 cups of coffee on every street corner in every major city nationwide is peddling terrible dark sludge in a cup that supposedly is the public standard for good coffee.

Quite simply, most Americans have no concept of what fresh roasted coffee is.  Even to the point of people saying "I don't like coffee, it's too bitter."

People don't know that good coffee simply isn't bitter!

So for that reason my tips to the new roaster would be:

  • Don't spend a whole lot of money on a Ultra High Quality coffee.-  My experience tells me that no matter what bottom-rung moderately fresh coffee I choose to roast, my customers are falling over themselves trying to get at it.  When you are starting out, your technique wont be perfected for some time, so start out with a cheap coffee, your customers will love it regardless.

  • Don't obsess about perfection and micromanagement of your roasts-  You will find that very small fluctuations in roast temperature and time really won't make that much of a difference in the end result.  Your customers are going to love it anyway if you follow some basic guidelines.  It's not hard to win when you average customer is used to drinking a cup of dirt each morning.   :)

  • Your average customer will never be able to tell the difference between the Nutty-Chocolaty Guatemalan and your Citrusy Colombian, but they will sure know good coffee when it hits them.

When you get the general hang of it, you can start learning more and take your skills to perfection.

C. Green Coffee Prep

Coffee is ideally 10%-14% water weight.  In my work in Green Coffee in Colombia, we would strive to ship coffee as high as 16% so that it would arrive at the customer at that magic 14% moisture mark.

During the roast process you can expect to lose up to 20% of the weight of the coffee due to moisture loss and burning of oils and other interior pergamino skins in the form of evaporation, smoke and chaff.

So for every pound of finished coffee that you require, add 3.2OZ or 20% extra coffee to your drum.  I found that this number works well for pulling the roast at second crack. So use this following table as a rough guide.  Every coffee is different so use this as only a rule of thumb.  If you roast well into 2nd crack, you will lose even more weight.  So, in general, the longer or darker you roast, the more and more coffee you will have to provide to complete the volume (12OZ or 16OZ) that you intend to sell.

To restate, a vienna/french roast will take more or less 1/3 more beans to make 1 pound of coffee as compared to a full city.   Plus, it will cost you more gas to get you to that point.  So, in order to reduce cost per pound keep your roast times shorter and less dark if you have the choice.

Finished Roast Volume

Green Load

1Lb

1Lb 3.2 OZ

2Lb

2Lb 6.4 OZ

3Lb

3Lb 9.6 OZ

4Lb

4Lb 12.8 OZ

5Lb

6Lb

6Lb

7Lb 3.2 OZ

7Lb

8Lb 6.4 OZ

8Lb

9Lb 9.6 OZ

While were on the subject of green loads, the 4, 6, 8 and 12 pound drums are best rated for 4, 6, 8 and 12 pounds of green coffee, not finished coffee.  That said, I have, the drums have been rated with a MAX load, that you can attempt if you have extra heat. With this method you will get decent, albeit possiblyslightly uneven roasts by adding a few degrees of temperature to my standard roast profile.  

***PLEASE NOTE THAT THESE SHOULD BE CONSIDERED ROUGH RULES OF THUMB, EVERY GRILL, COFFEE, AND PERSON WILL ROAST DIFFERENTLY.  USE THESE NUMBERS AS A STARTING POINT AND LEARN WHAT BEST WORKS FOR YOU AND YOUR COFFEE.***

D. Roaster Prep & Roast Profiles for All Drums

It is important to understand that each of the RK Drums (4, 6, 8 and 12) will roast with approximately the same results at a given % volume for a given temperature.  So, a 4, 6, 8 and 12 pound drum will roast the same at its 100% rated volume.  To clarify, a 4Lb Drum with 4Lbs of coffee at a given temperature will roast the same as a 8Lb drum with 8Lbs of coffee at the same temperature.

While each drum can roast more than its rated green volume, be aware that these tables may show green loads in excess of the rated load, and can be done, but will need higher than normal temperature to accommodate the extra amount of bean mass.  Beware however, that your roast uniformity may suffer slightly.

The following table works for us with most coffees and should be used as a starting point. The numbers aren't exact, and you won't be exactly on these numbers no matter how hard you try, but you should likely be able to hit these numbers give or take 1 minute with these temperatures and get excellent coffee.  They seem to work for most grills, and probably yours.  But if the times aren't working out based on the scheduled temperature, you will need to adjust the heat up or down to accelerate or decelerate the roast.

To clarify, this is a starting point.  There could be other variables in setting up your roaster.  Your probe could sit higher or lower to the flames than the model used to generate the below numbers.  Your heat flow could be different and thus register higher or lower, thus it is important to understand that we must find a starting point, a profile that works on your grill/setup.  These numbers are where we start.

If you take a 4LB drum example below, roasting 4LB green.  You should be able to arrive at 1st and 2nd crack on time based upon 550-600 degrees according to the chart.  On your grill you may find that in actuality, because of the aforementioned variables that your grill is only able to deliver 1st and 2nd crack on time at at 650 degrees.  Or it could happen at a lower heat setting as well.  Our time on the first roast will be the key if we have injected enough heat into the system or not enough.

So understand that the first roasts we do on a new setup, are more like calibration roasts.  We won't ruin any coffee, but it may not be perfect either.  We are trying to get a feel for the grill and the process.  You must learn to target a timely arrival of 1st and 2nd crack by adjusting the amount of heat you put into the system.

Please consider this article mandatory reading:

Roasting Techniques:  Roasting to target your time, not your temperature

With this understood, lets start roasting using the following charts as a starting point and then adjust the heat up or down so that we can time the arrival of 1st and 2nd accordingly.

2LB DRUM

Finished Roast Volume

Green Load

%Load

Temp

Est. 1st Crack

Est. 2nd Crack

1/2LB

9.6 OZ

25%

470

6 mins

10 mins

1Lb

1Lb 3.2 OZ

50%

500-525

9 mins

12 mins

1.5Lb

1Lb 4.8 OZ

75%

525-550

14 mins

16 mins

2Lb

2Lb 6.4 OZ

100%

550-600

16 mins

18 mins

4LB DRUM

Finished Roast Volume

Green Load

%Load

Temp

Est. 1st Crack

Est. 2nd Crack

1Lb

1Lb 3.2 OZ

25%

470

8 mins

12 mins

2Lb

2Lb 6.4 OZ

50%

500-525

11 mins

14 mins

3Lb

3Lb 9.6 OZ

75%

525-550

16 mins

18 mins

4Lb

4Lb 12.8 OZ

100%

550-600

18 mins

20 - 21 mins

6LB DRUM

Finished Roast Volume

Green Load

%Load

Temp

Est. 1st Crack

Est. 2nd Crack

1Lb

1Lb 3.2 OZ

16.6%

450-470

8 mins

10 mins

2Lb

2Lb 6.4 OZ

33.3%

470-500

12 mins

14 mins

3Lb

3Lb 9.6 OZ

50%

500-525

14 mins

16 mins

4Lb

4Lb 12.8 OZ

66.6%

525-550

16 mins

18 mins

5Lb

6Lb

83.3%

550-575

18 mins

19 mins

6Lb

7Lb 3.2 OZ

100%

575-625

19 mins

21 mins

8LB DRUM

Finished Roast Volume

Green Load

%Load

Temp

Est. 1st Crack

Est. 2nd Crack

1Lb

1Lb 3.2 OZ

12.5%

450-470

8 mins

10 mins

2Lb

2Lb 6.4 OZ

25%

470-480

10 mins

12 mins

3Lb

3Lb 9.6 OZ

37.5%

490-500

12 mins

14 mins

4Lb

4Lb 12.8 OZ

50%

500-525

14 mins

15.5 mins

5Lb

6Lb

62.5%

525-535

16 mins

17.5 mins

6Lb

7Lb 3.2 OZ

75% 535-565 17 mins

19 mins

7Lb

8Lb 6.4 OZ

87.5% 565-585 19 mins

20.5 mins

8Lb

9Lb 9.6 OZ

100%

600-625

19 mins

21 mins

12LB DRUM

Finished Roast Volume

Green Load

%Load

Temp

Est. 1st Crack

Est. 2nd Crack

1Lb

1Lb 3.2 OZ

8.3%

450-470

8 mins

10 mins

2Lb

2Lb 6.4 OZ

17%

470-480

9 mins

11 mins

3Lb

3Lb 9.6 OZ

25%

490-500

9 mins

11 mins

4Lb

4Lb 12.8 OZ

33%

500-525

10 mins

12 mins

5Lb

6Lb

42%

525-535

12 mins

14 mins

6Lb

7Lb 3.2 OZ

50%

535-565

12 mins

14 mins

7Lb

8Lb 6.4 OZ

58.3%

565-585

16 mins

17.5 mins

8Lb

9Lb 9.6 OZ

66%

600-625

16 mins

17.5 mins

9LB

10LB 12.8 OZ

75%

625-650

17 min

19 min

10LB

12LB

83%

625-650

17 min

19 min

11LB

13Lb 3.2 OZ

92%

650-675

19 min

21 min

12LB

14Lb

100%

650-675

19 min

21 min

First thing you want to do is clean your grill if you haven't already, get the chaff and other material out of the bottom of the grill.  Take your green coffee load (I love the 5 gallon square buckets from the hardware store as you can use the corner as a pour spout to load the drum.)

Let's pre-heat the drum and the grill.  Light your burners and set to MAX temp.  Put the drum in the grill, close the lid and close the latch.  Turn on the motor so the drum heats evenly and wait until the temperature rises close to your target temperature for the green load of your choosing.

When the temp gets close to the target temperature, turn off the motor and put on your protective glove on your unfavored hand (the hand that grabs the spit rod), open the lid, remove the drum and set the handle end on the ground and prop the coupler end up against the grill.

Close the grill lid to keep the heat in.

BE CAREFUL THE DRUM IS SUPER HOT AND WILL BURN YOU INSTANTLY.  YES IT WILL LEAVE A SCAR!

E. Coffee Loading

With your protected hand, pull the pin and open the drum.  I like to set the lid at a 45 degree angle and  use it as a bit of a funnel to pour the coffee into the drum.

After you have all the coffee in, close the lid and latch.  

Grab the rod by the coupler with your protected hand and grab the handle with the other hand and insert into the coupler and drop the handle side onto the bearing and close the lid on the grill and turn on the switch.

F. Roasting to 1st Crack

Your Roast has now begun.  Start your stopwatch or wristwatch and monitor your time.  Your temperature will have dropped after opening the lid, this is fine, but you will want to see the grill come back to your target temperature within about 3 minutes.  If you see that you are not coming back up in temperature, then give it more gas to boost it up to temperature.

What you need to do is set your burners up or down to maintain your target temperature.  So adjust as necessary.

You won't see, or hear much during the first 6 minutes even in the smallest roasts.

What we are going to begin doing at this point is hold our temperature all the way to 1st crack, then we will adjust as necessary.

1st Crack has been said to sound a bit like the popping of popcorn.  This is where the bean is releasing a large amount of its moisture.  As 1st crack approaches, if you stand near the rear of the grill you will begin to smell a rather pungent odor that kind of burns your nose and eyes.  When you start smelling this, we are getting close to 1st.  Light white smoke will gradually increase more and more until the onset of first.  Use this smoke and the pungent odor to help you time the arrival of first crack.

You will want to do your best to time the arrival of first crack, more or less to the numbers in the tables on the previous page.  Let's look at an example.

Lets take the example of the 4Lb Drum with a 2Lb load.  Here is the data from our table:

4LB DRUM

Finished Roast Volume

Green Load

%Load

Temp

Est. 1st Crack

Est. 2nd Crack

1Lb

1Lb 3.2 OZ

25%

470

8 mins

12 mins

2Lb

2Lb 6.4 OZ

50%

500-525

11 mins

14 mins

3Lb

3Lb 9.6 OZ

75%

525-550

16 mins

18 mins

4Lb

4Lb 12.8 OZ

100%

550-600

18 mins

20 - 21 mins

We are going to run about 500F right up till 1st crack.  We estimate 1st crack at 11 minutes.  If we use the smoke as a gauge, you will start to see the smoke about 1-2 minutes before 1st.  So to clarify, we should be seeing smoke by about 9 to 10 minutes or so.  If we are seeing no smoke at all by say 10:30, we now know we are getting behind schedule as there is usually a minute or two of smoke before 1st.  Let's crank the heat up a bit to get us back on our schedule.  We are shooting to end the roast at 14 mins in this example so we don't want to drag the roast out any longer than necessary.  To do so dulls the roast and you loose some of your brightness in the coffee the longer you go past the recommended time.

Conversely, if 1st crack starts at 9 minutes and the interval between the pops is very rapid (like machine gun fire) then you are roasting too hot and you need to back off your temps by 20 degrees or so.

You will initially hear one pop, then two, then a few more and then all the beans will start to go, similar to the way microwave popcorn pops in the bag.

As 1st crack reaches its rolling stage, where it rolls forward seemingly unstoppable, the smoke will be at its most intense.  At this point lets reduce the temperature by 10 to 25 degrees.  Use more of a drop for the larger the roast.  8 Pounds, lets drop 25 degrees.  2-4 pounds lets drop 10 and what we want to do is just reduce the temperature and let the roast coast on its own heat.  The popping will begin to subside and the smoke will taper off.  Now the beans are exothermic and begin to generate their own heat.  Heat is sustained in the bean mass and they sort of cook themselves.  For this reason, we back off on the heat a bit and it also serves to improve the roast.

G. Roasting to 2nd Crack

As 1st crack subsides, the coffee will slowly cease to pop, the smoke will all but completely subside and the only thing you will hear is the swishing of the coffee in the drum.  At this point the coffee is still very hard and really not useable for anything.  The coffee is still semi-green and will have a strong grassy flavor if you try to drink it now.  We need to keep going a bit.

Lets monitor our temperature and ride it out.  We still should be 10 to 25 degrees below our initial temp depending upon the green load.  (see above).

In our 2Lb example in the 4Lb drum, we are looking for 2nd crack to occur at around 14 minutes.  As we approach second crack, the coffee will increase in temperature automatically without you raising the heat.  Not a lot but it will slowly begin to creep up.  Maintain your temperature and start watching for the white smoke again.

This is the final release of moisture and oils.  We should start seeing the smoke again, a minute or two before the second crack actually starts.

2nd crack sounds more like rice crispies, having a higher frequency of a pop than 1st.  The smoke is also thicker and heavier.  In the same fashion we should start seeing smoke by say, 12 or 13 minutes.  If we are seeing no smoke by say 13:30, we know that we are not anywhere close to 2nd.  Lets push the heat up by 20 degrees just to shove our roast over the top and try to finish on time.

Lets go ahead and get your glove on as we're about to pull the coffee, also turn on your cooling fan and get your cooling device setup.

The smoke thickens and you will slowly start to begin the higher pitch cracking.  This is the physical fracturing of the bean itself.  If you look around the edges of the bean, you will see these fine cracks at the end of the roast.

The cracks will begin to increase in frequency and the smoke will grow more intense to the point where the cracks are continuous and non-stop.

This is described as rolling second crack.

Now we need to examine here this very important moment.  The minute before the start of 2nd and the minute after the start of 2nd are perhaps the most important moments of the roast and argurably where the roast will be a success or a failure.

Personally I will recommend that for a light roast you stop the roast an estimate 1 minute before 2nd and for a dark roast, 30 secs to 1 minute after the begin of 2nd.

All of the finishing of the coffee exists really in these last 2 minutes and during the cooling process.

In most cases, I will personally stop the roast right as soon as 2nd crack is established.  When I am sure that the majority of the beans are starting to crack.  This, for me represents the average balanced coffee.  I'm sure I'll get emails about that, like I said before, every roast, and roast master is different and prefers different things.  In my opinion, 1 minute before 2nd crack, you will start to lose all of the grassy origin flavors, and even possibly some of the uniqueness of the coffee.  At about rolling 2nd crack and forward, the coffee will noticeably begin to take on a darker, heavier, possibly more bitter and increasingly burned flavor (Sort of like Starbucks coffee).

I'll recommend that you should almost never go past about 1 minute after 2nd crack as it results in a very dark coffee.  Approaching 2-3 minutes post 2nd crack it is likely that the internal oils of the coffee will actually ignite and catch fire.  Yep, that's bad.  It happens to just about everyone at least once!

So in this example, as soon as you can tell that most of the beans are cracking let's stop the roast.

H. Cooling Your Roast

THE DRUM IS SUPER HOT, WEAR PROTECTION

As 2nd crack is fully established, lets pull the coffee (You can pull it earlier or later around this point depending on your coffee or preference.)

Lower your burners to the lowest setting.

Open the lid of the grill, watch the door and pin, stop the motor when the motor is moving to the top position, rotate the drum with your hand as necessary.  While the drum is sitting here on the bracket, lets go ahead and open the latch and hold the door closed with the thumb of your gloved hand.

Use your other 3 or 4 gloved fingers to wrap under the spit rod.  Note that the coffee will be smoking and still cooking in its own heat.

Lift the drum and coffee off the motor and bearing and close the lid of the grill to hold your heat in if you intend to do another roast, otherwise turn off your burners in the step before.  If it helps, quickly set the handle on the ground and prop the drum up against the grill so you can close the grill lid.  Sometimes you may find it easier to just leave the lid open as you will likely be short on hands, that's fine, it will just cost you more gas to heat it back up.  Not a big deal if you can't get to it though.

Next, pick up the drum, and carry it over to your cooling device.  Using your gloved thumb, open the door and dump your coffee into the cooling tray.  Note that the coffee is still cooking and it is important to cool the coffee as quickly as possible to preserve the quality of the roast.  You may even want to anticipate your intended stop point of the roast by 15 or 20 seconds as this is the time it will take you to stop the roast and get the coffee in the cooler.

After the drum is empty prop it back up against the grill, with the door open to begin your next roast.

You will get some chaff (a sort of paper like material that comes off the roasted coffee) that will blow away.  You may even choose to pour the coffee slowly into your cooler allowing the wind to blow the chaff out of the coffee, or you can use a large spoon, wooden or stainless to stir the coffee, aid chaff removal and cooling.

While the coffee is cooling down, go back to your drum and load your next batch of green beans and repeat the process and get the next roast going.

After about 90 seconds, the coffee should be cool enough to touch.  I usually offload the coffee into a bucket so I can go and bag later for sale.

So, that's the end of the roast tutorial.  I am by no means a roast expert, now with 13 and counting,  years under my belt,  as compared to some of the great people out there.  I welcome any comments and corrections.  This however, should reliably get you good reproduceable, coffee and plenty of customers that are in love with it.

-Happy Roasting!-

I. Quick Roast Profiles for all Drums

2LB DRUM

Finished Roast Volume Green Load %Load Temp Est. 1st Crack Est. 2nd Crack
1/2LB 9.6 OZ 25% 470 6 mins 10 mins
1Lb 1Lb 3.2 OZ 50% 500-525 9 mins 12 mins
1.5Lb 1Lb 12.8 OZ 75% 525-550 14 mins 16 mins
2Lb 2Lb 6.4 OZ 100% 550-600 16 mins 18 mins

4LB DRUM

Finished Roast Volume Green Load %Load Temp Est. 1st Crack Est. 2nd Crack
1Lb 1Lb 3.2 OZ 25% 470 8 mins 12 mins
2Lb 2Lb 6.4 OZ 50% 500-525 11 mins 14 mins
3Lb 3Lb 9.6 OZ 75% 525-550 16 mins 18 mins
4Lb 4Lb 12.8 OZ 100% 550-600 18 mins 20 - 21 mins

6LB DRUM

Finished Roast Volume Green Load %Load Temp Est. 1st Crack Est. 2nd Crack
1Lb 1Lb 3.2 OZ 16.6% 450-470 8 mins 10 mins
2Lb 2Lb 6.4 OZ 33.3% 470-500 12 mins 14 mins
3Lb 3Lb 9.6 OZ 50% 500-525 14 mins 16 mins
4Lb 4Lb 12.8 OZ 66.6% 525-550 16 mins 18 mins
5Lb 6Lb 83.3% 550-575 18 mins 19 mins
6Lb 7Lb 3.2 OZ 100% 575-625 19 mins 21 mins

8LB DRUM

Finished Roast Volume Green Load %Load Temp Est. 1st Crack Est. 2nd Crack
1Lb 1Lb 3.2 OZ 12.5% 450-470 8 mins 10 mins
2Lb 2Lb 6.4 OZ 25% 470-480 10 mins 12 mins
3Lb 3Lb 9.6 OZ 37.5% 490-500 12 mins 14 mins
4Lb 4Lb 12.8 OZ 50% 500-525 14 mins 15.5 mins
5Lb 6Lb 62.5% 525-535 16 mins 17.5 mins
6Lb 7Lb 3.2 OZ 75% 535-565 17 mins 19 mins
7Lb 8Lb 6.4 OZ 87.5% 565-585 19 mins 20.5 mins
8Lb 9Lb 9.6 OZ 100% 600-625 19 mins 21 mins

12LB DRUM

Finished Roast Volume Green Load %Load Temp Est. 1st Crack Est. 2nd Crack
1Lb 1Lb 3.2 OZ 8.3% 450-470 8 mins 10 mins
2Lb 2Lb 6.4 OZ 17% 470-480 9 mins 11 mins
3Lb 3Lb 9.6 OZ 25% 490-500 9 mins 11 mins
4Lb 4Lb 12.8 OZ 33% 500-525 10 mins 12 mins
5Lb 6Lb 42% 525-535 12 mins 14 mins
6Lb 7Lb 3.2 OZ 50% 535-565 12 mins 14 mins
7Lb 8Lb 6.4 OZ 58.3% 565-585 16 mins 17.5 mins
8Lb 9Lb 9.6 OZ 66% 600-625 16 mins 17.5 mins
9LB 10LB 12.8 OZ 75% 625-650 17 min 19 min
10LB 12LB 83% 625-650 17 min 19 min
11LB 13Lb 3.2 OZ 92% 650-675 19 min 21 min
12LB 14Lb 100% 650-675 19 min 21 min