Planning your cooler

It’s very important in the roasting process, to cool your coffee properly.  

 

Whatever solution you choose, you’ll need to provide a cooling solution that can cool down that hot coffee.  If you fail to cool your coffee properly the coffee will keep roasting within it’s own heat and get darker and darker.  Cooling is also important to the flavor of the coffee.  Let’s aim to cool down our coffee within about 4 minutes.  Here are some cooler solutions for all roasters.

How do I cool my coffee\product after the roast?

There are many methods to cool your coffee, and they really don't have to be complicated.  While we offer some professional and attractive cooling solutions there are some very easy and economical solutions to accomplish this goal.  

Remember cooling this coffee is a bit like blowing on your hot soup.  We're only trying to move cooler air across the hot material.  So whether you use a fan, or a leaf blower, or a shop vac, it's all about moving air over your coffee.  The more coffee you are trying to cool, the more robust your solution needs to be.

  1.  The Box Fan Cooler -  This is by far the most economical and easy to achieve method to cool your coffee.    The idea is roughly this.  Prop your standard 20" store box fan up off the ground (so the fan can get air) , and orient it so the wind blows upwards towards the sky.   Next, place your coffee on top of the fan so the air blows through the coffee.  It not only removes the chaff, but it cools the coffee too.  This design can be rough and dirty, or it can be a work of art 

box fan coffee cooler enio hernandez

(photo and cooler courtesy of Enio Hernandez)

This can be made with simple 2x4's and some stainless steel window screen from Home Depot.  (Don't use fiberglass, or aluminum screen as fiberglass can melt, and aluminum has been linked to Alzheimer's disease).  Basically the procedure is to staple, or otherwise attach the screen to the wood frame.  This screen can be reinforced with stiff steel wire (insulation wire stringers work well) if need be, or wood framing.  Note that the downside of this method is that the chaff from the coffee will get blown out and around you as it cools.  It's a tad messy, but you just can't argue its effectiveness and cost.  This average setup could cost as low as $25-$40.  One or more of these coolers can be made and positioned side-by-side for large volume coffee cooling above 12 pounds per batch.

RK Drums "Model F" Cooler

Check out the "Model F Cooler" from RK Drums that can cool from 2LB to 12LB using a common $20 household box fan.  Note that the fan should be oriented to blow on the bottom of the tray 

RK Drums Model F Cooler

 

2.  The 16" Cooling Tray - For small roasters up to the 4LB drum, the 16"x3" cooling tray at the bottom of this page can be utilized over the box fan with the same method.  Note that this tray only holds roughly 3.5 pounds of coffee.

16 inch cooling tray for cooling coffee after roasting

3.  The Model T Starter Tray - The Model T Starter, is a large version of the 16" Cooling tray above.  11 pounds of stainless steel in fact.  The concept behind this starter tray, is that it allows you to get "Started" on purchasing your "Model T Cooler" without purchasing the entire cooler.  Buy positioning this Starter cooler over the standard box fan in the same fashion as the above examples, you  can cool up to 8 or 12LB of coffee per batch.  Later as your business progresses you can add on the Model T Fan unit, thereby completing your Model T cooler.  Note however, that the fan unit can only sustain 8LB of cooling capacity.  2 of these starter trays can be positioned over 2 fans for a large capacity solution (24LB? per batch)

Model T Coffee Cooler (Starter)

4.  The Model T CoolerThe Model T Cooler is an amazing and well built machine, but note that it can only cool a maximum of 8LB of coffee.  Attempts to cool in excess of 8LB has burned out the fan motors in testing, but we've had no failures at the 8LB rating. 

The Model T was designed to provide a clean and efficient method to remove chaff, as well as provide a way to provide an attractive cooling unit to accompany your roaster.  Chaff is cleanly collected in a collection tray below the coffee hopper.  Kindly note the 8LB maximum restriction. 

Model T Advanced Coffee Cooler Assembled RK Drums Model T Components

There are many methods to cool your coffee, and they really don't have to be complicated.  While we offer some professional and attractive cooling solutions there are some very easy and economical solutions to accomplish this goal.

Remember cooling this coffee is a bit like blowing on your hot soup.  We're only trying to move cooler air across the hot material.  So whether you use a fan, or a leaf blower, or a shop vac, it's all about moving air over your coffee.  The more coffee you are trying to cool, the more robust your solution needs to be.

For the 2LB Drum, we recommend one of the following 4 methods.

  1.  The Box Fan Cooler -  This is by far the most economical and easy to achieve method to cool your coffee.    The idea is roughly this.  Prop your standard 20" store box fan up off the ground (so the fan can get air) , and orient it so the wind blows upwards towards the sky.   Next, place your coffee on top of the fan so the air blows through the coffee.  It not only removes the chaff, but it cools the coffee too.  This design can be rough and dirty, or it can be a work of art

box fan coffee cooler enio hernandez

(photo and cooler courtesy of Enio Hernandez)

 

This can be made with simple 2x4's and some stainless steel window screen from Home Depot.  (Don't use fiberglass, or aluminum screen as fiberglass can melt, and aluminum has been linked to Alzheimer's disease).  Basically the procedure is to staple, or otherwise attach the screen to the wood frame.  This screen can be reinforced with stiff steel wire (insulation wire stringers work well) if need be, or wood framing.  Note that the downside of this method is that the chaff from the coffee will get blown out and around you as it cools.  It's a tad messy, but you just can't argue its effectiveness and cost.  This average setup could cost as low as $25-$40.  One or more of these coolers can be made and positioned side-by-side for large volume coffee cooling above 12 pounds per batch.

RK Drums "Model F" Cooler

Check out the "Model F Cooler" from RK Drums that can cool from 2LB to 12LB using a common $20 household box fan.  Note that the fan should be oriented to blow on the bottom of the tray

RK Drums Model F Cooler

2.  The 16" Cooling Tray - For small roasters up to the 4LB drum, the 16"x3" cooling tray at the bottom of this page can be utilized over the box fan with the same method.  Note that this tray only holds roughly 3.5 pounds of coffee.

16 inch cooling tray for cooling coffee after roasting

3.  The Model T Starter Tray - The Model T Starter, is a large version of the 16" Cooling tray above.  11 pounds of stainless steel in fact.  The concept behind this starter tray, is that it allows you to get "Started" on purchasing your "Model T Cooler" without purchasing the entire cooler.  Buy positioning this Starter cooler over the standard box fan in the same fashion as the above examples, you  can cool up to 8 or 12LB of coffee per batch.  Later as your business progresses you can add on the Model T Fan unit, thereby completing your Model T cooler.  Note however, that the fan unit can only sustain 8LB of cooling capacity.  2 of these starter trays can be positioned over 2 fans for a large capacity solution (24LB? per batch)

Model T Coffee Cooler (Starter)

4.  The Model T CoolerThe Model T Cooler is an amazing and well built machine, but note that it can only cool a maximum of 8LB of coffee.  Attempts to cool in excess of 8LB has burned out the fan motors in testing, but we've had no failures at the 8LB rating.

The Model T was designed to provide a clean and efficient method to remove chaff, as well as provide a way to provide an attractive cooling unit to accompany your roaster.  Chaff is cleanly collected in a collection tray below the coffee hopper.  Kindly note the 8LB maximum restriction.

Model T Advanced Coffee Cooler AssembledRK Drums Model T Components

There are many methods to cool your coffee, and they really don't have to be complicated.  While we offer some professional and attractive cooling solutions there are some very easy and economical solutions to accomplish this goal.  

Remember cooling this coffee is a bit like blowing on your hot soup.  We're only trying to move cooler air across the hot material.  So whether you use a fan, or a leaf blower, or a shop vac, it's all about moving air over your coffee.  The more coffee you are trying to cool, the more robust your solution needs to be.

For the 4LB Drum, we recommend one of the following 4 methods.

  1.  The Box Fan Cooler -  This is by far the most economical and easy to achieve method to cool your coffee.    The idea is roughly this.  Prop your standard 20" store box fan up off the ground (so the fan can get air) , and orient it so the wind blows upwards towards the sky.   Next, place your coffee on top of the fan so the air blows through the coffee.  It not only removes the chaff, but it cools the coffee too.  This design can be rough and dirty, or it can be a work of art 

box fan coffee cooler enio hernandez

(photo and cooler courtesy of Enio Hernandez)

 

This can be made with simple 2x4's and some stainless steel window screen from Home Depot.  (Don't use fiberglass, or aluminum screen as fiberglass can melt, and aluminum has been linked to Alzheimer's disease).  Basically the procedure is to staple, or otherwise attach the screen to the wood frame.  This screen can be reinforced with stiff steel wire (insulation wire stringers work well) if need be, or wood framing.  Note that the downside of this method is that the chaff from the coffee will get blown out and around you as it cools.  It's a tad messy, but you just can't argue its effectiveness and cost.  This average setup could cost as low as $25-$40.  One or more of these coolers can be made and positioned side-by-side for large volume coffee cooling above 12 pounds per batch.

RK Drums "Model F" Cooler

Check out the "Model F Cooler" from RK Drums that can cool from 2LB to 12LB using a common $20 household box fan.  Note that the fan should be oriented to blow on the bottom of the tray

RK Drums Model F Cooler

2.  The 16" Cooling Tray - For small roasters up to the 4LB drum, the 16"x3" cooling tray at the bottom of this page can be utilized over the box fan with the same method.  Note that this tray only holds roughly 3.5 pounds of coffee.

16 inch cooling tray for cooling coffee after roasting

3.  The Model T Starter Tray - The Model T Starter, is a large version of the 16" Cooling tray.  11 pounds of stainless steel in fact.  The concept behind this starter tray, is that it allows you to get "Started" on purchasing your "Model T Cooler" without purchasing the entire cooler.  Buy positioning this Starter cooler over the standard box fan in the same fashion as the above examples, you  can cool up to 8 or 12LB of coffee per batch.  Later as your business progresses you can add on the Model T Fan unit, thereby completing your Model T cooler.  Note however, that the fan unit can only sustain 8LB of cooling capacity.  2 of these starter trays can be positioned over 2 fans for a large capacity solution (24LB? per batch)

Model T Coffee Cooler (Starter)

4.  The Model T CoolerThe Model T Cooler is an amazing and well built machine, but note that it can only cool a maximum of 8LB of coffee.  Attempts to cool in excess of 8LB has burned out the fan motors in testing, but we've had no failures at the 8LB rating. 

The Model T was designed to provide a clean and efficient method to remove chaff, as well as provide a way to provide an attractive cooling unit to accompany your roaster.  Chaff is cleanly collected in a collection tray below the coffee hopper.  Kindly note the 8LB maximum restriction. 

Model T Advanced Coffee Cooler Assembled 
RK Drums Model T Components

There are many methods to cool your coffee, and they really don't have to be complicated.  While we offer some professional and attractive cooling solutions there are some very easy and economical solutions to accomplish this goal.  

Remember cooling this coffee is a bit like blowing on your hot soup.  We're only trying to move cooler air across the hot material.  So whether you use a fan, or a leaf blower, or a shop vac, it's all about moving air over your coffee.  The more coffee you are trying to cool, the more robust your solution needs to be.

For the 6LB Drum, we recommend one of the following 3 methods.

  1.  The Box Fan Cooler -  This is by far the most economical and easy to achieve method to cool your coffee.    The idea is roughly this.  Prop your standard 20" store box fan up off the ground (so the fan can get air) , and orient it so the wind blows upwards towards the sky.   Next, place your coffee on top of the fan so the air blows through the coffee.  It not only removes the chaff, but it cools the coffee too.  This design can be rough and dirty, or it can be a work of art 

box fan coffee cooler enio hernandez

(photo and cooler courtesy of Enio Hernandez)

This can be made with simple 2x4's and some stainless steel window screen from Home Depot.  (Don't use fiberglass, or aluminum screen as fiberglass can melt, and aluminum has been linked to Alzheimer's disease).  Basically the procedure is to staple, or otherwise attach the screen to the wood frame.  This screen can be reinforced with stiff steel wire (insulation wire stringers work well) if need be, or wood framing.  Note that the downside of this method is that the chaff from the coffee will get blown out and around you as it cools.  It's a tad messy, but you just can't argue its effectiveness and cost.  This average setup could cost as low as $25-$40.  One or more of these coolers can be made and positioned side-by-side for large volume coffee cooling above 12 pounds per batch.

RK Drums "Model F" Cooler

Check out the "Model F Cooler" from RK Drums that can cool from 2LB to 12LB using a common $20 household box fan.  Note that the fan should be oriented to blow on the bottom of the tray

RK Drums Model F Cooler

2.  The Model T Starter Tray - The Model T Starter, is a large version of the 16" Cooling tray   11 pounds of stainless steel in fact.  The concept behind this starter tray, is that it allows you to get "Started" on purchasing your "Model T Cooler" without purchasing the entire cooler.  Buy positioning this Starter cooler over the standard box fan in the same fashion as the above examples, you  can cool up to 8 or 12LB of coffee per batch.  Later as your business progresses you can add on the Model T Fan unit, thereby completing your Model T cooler.  Note however, that the fan unit can only sustain 8LB of cooling capacity.  2 of these starter trays can be positioned over 2 fans for a large capacity solution (24LB? per batch)

Model T Coffee Cooler (Starter)

3.  The Model T CoolerThe Model T Cooler is an amazing and well built machine, but note that it can only cool a maximum of 8LB of coffee.  Attempts to cool in excess of 8LB has burned out the fan motors in testing, but we've had no failures at the 8LB rating. 

The Model T was designed to provide a clean and efficient method to remove chaff, as well as provide a way to provide an attractive cooling unit to accompany your roaster.  Chaff is cleanly collected in a collection tray below the coffee hopper.  Kindly note the 8LB maximum restriction. 

Model T Advanced Coffee Cooler Assembled RK Drums Model T Components

There are many methods to cool your coffee, and they really don't have to be complicated.  While we offer some professional and attractive cooling solutions there are some very easy and economical solutions to accomplish this goal.  

Remember cooling this coffee is a bit like blowing on your hot soup.  We're only trying to move cooler air across the hot material.  So whether you use a fan, or a leaf blower, or a shop vac, it's all about moving air over your coffee.  The more coffee you are trying to cool, the more robust your solution needs to be.

For the 8LB Drum, we recommend one of the following 3 methods.

  1.  The Box Fan Cooler -  This is by far the most economical and easy to achieve method to cool your coffee.    The idea is roughly this.  Prop your standard 20" store box fan up off the ground (so the fan can get air) , and orient it so the wind blows upwards towards the sky.   Next, place your coffee on top of the fan so the air blows through the coffee.  It not only removes the chaff, but it cools the coffee too.  This design can be rough and dirty, or it can be a work of art 

box fan coffee cooler enio hernandez

(photo and cooler courtesy of Enio Hernandez)

 

This can be made with simple 2x4's and some stainless steel window screen from Home Depot.  (Don't use fiberglass, or aluminum screen as fiberglass can melt, and aluminum has been linked to Alzheimer's disease).  Basically the procedure is to staple, or otherwise attach the screen to the wood frame.  This screen can be reinforced with stiff steel wire (insulation wire stringers work well) if need be, or wood framing.  Note that the downside of this method is that the chaff from the coffee will get blown out and around you as it cools.  It's a tad messy, but you just can't argue its effectiveness and cost.  This average setup could cost as low as $25-$40.  One or more of these coolers can be made and positioned side-by-side for large volume coffee cooling above 12 pounds per batch.

RK Drums "Model F" Cooler

Check out the "Model F Cooler" from RK Drums that can cool from 2LB to 12LB using a common $20 household box fan.  Note that the fan should be oriented to blow on the bottom of the tray

RK Drums Model F Cooler

2.  The Model T Starter Tray - The Model T Starter, is a large version of the 16" Cooling tray.  11 pounds of stainless steel in fact.  The concept behind this starter tray, is that it allows you to get "Started" on purchasing your "Model T Cooler" without purchasing the entire cooler.  Buy positioning this Starter cooler over the standard box fan in the same fashion as the above examples, you  can cool up to 8 or 12LB of coffee per batch.  Later as your business progresses you can add on the Model T Fan unit, thereby completing your Model T cooler.  Note however, that the fan unit can only sustain 8LB of cooling capacity.  2 of these starter trays can be positioned over 2 fans for a large capacity solution (24LB? per batch)

Model T Coffee Cooler (Starter)

3.  The Model T CoolerThe Model T Cooler is an amazing and well built machine, but note that it can only cool a maximum of 8LB of coffee.  Attempts to cool in excess of 8LB has burned out the fan motors in testing, but we've had no failures at the 8LB rating. 

The Model T was designed to provide a clean and efficient method to remove chaff, as well as provide a way to provide an attractive cooling unit to accompany your roaster.  Chaff is cleanly collected in a collection tray below the coffee hopper.  Kindly note the 8LB maximum restriction. 

Model T Advanced Coffee Cooler Assembled RK Drums Model T Components

There are many methods to cool your coffee, and they really don't have to be complicated.  While we offer some professional and attractive cooling solutions there are some very easy and economical solutions to accomplish this goal.  

Remember cooling this coffee is a bit like blowing on your hot soup.  We're only trying to move cooler air across the hot material.  So whether you use a fan, or a leaf blower, or a shop vac, it's all about moving air over your coffee.  The more coffee you are trying to cool, the more robust your solution needs to be.

For the 12LB Drum, we recommend one of the following 2 methods.  RK Drums does not currently have an "off the shelf" cooling solution for 12LB batches.  

  1.  The Box Fan Cooler -  This is by far the most economical and easy to achieve method to cool your coffee.    The idea is roughly this.  Prop your standard 20" store box fan up off the ground (so the fan can get air) , and orient it so the wind blows upwards towards the sky.   Next, place your coffee on top of the fan so the air blows through the coffee.  It not only removes the chaff, but it cools the coffee too.  This design can be rough and dirty, or it can be a work of art 

box fan coffee cooler enio hernandez

(photo and cooler courtesy of Enio Hernandez)

 

This can be made with simple 2x4's and some stainless steel window screen from Home Depot.  (Don't use fiberglass, or aluminum screen as fiberglass can melt, and aluminum has been linked to Alzheimer's disease).  Basically the procedure is to staple, or otherwise attach the screen to the wood frame.  This screen can be reinforced with stiff steel wire (insulation wire stringers work well) if need be, or wood framing.  Note that the downside of this method is that the chaff from the coffee will get blown out and around you as it cools.  It's a tad messy, but you just can't argue its effectiveness and cost.  This average setup could cost as low as $25-$40.  One or more of these coolers can be made and positioned side-by-side for large volume coffee cooling above 12 pounds per batch.

RK Drums "Model F" Cooler

Check out the "Model F Cooler" from RK Drums that can cool from 2LB to 12LB using a common $20 household box fan.  Note that the fan should be oriented to blow on the bottom of the tray

RK Drums Model F Cooler

2.  The Model T Starter Tray - The Model T Starter, is a large version of the 16" Cooling tray above.  11 pounds of stainless steel in fact.  The concept behind this starter tray, is that it allows you to get "Started" on purchasing your "Model T Cooler" without purchasing the entire cooler.  Buy positioning this Starter cooler over the standard box fan in the same fashion as the above examples, you  can cool up to 8 or 12LB of coffee per batch.  Later as your business progresses you can add on the Model T Fan unit, thereby completing your Model T cooler.  Note however, that the fan unit can only sustain 8LB of cooling capacity.  2 of these starter trays can be positioned over 2 fans for a large capacity solution (24LB? per batch)

Model T Coffee Cooler (Starter)