how do you get an even roast

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This topic contains 2 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Ridge Brannon 9 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #4281

    Ridge Brannon
    Keymaster

    I am a gourmet coffee shop so, I can only use top quality beans.
    -Mitchell Periman

    #4282

    Ridge Brannon
    Keymaster

    Mitchell,

    Your question probably could have a complex answer… but…..in short getting an even roast is not a hard thing to do. Quality of the roast is ALWAYS exceptional, reliable and repeatable provided you set things up properly…… there are user-error situations that can cause an uneven roast…. such as roasting at low rpm (less than 6-10RPM), or without the drum being level, or with insufficient heat, but provided the roaster is set up with care, uneven roasts are not at all an issue.

    See this article for a more complete answer:

    http://www.rkdrums.com/index.php/articles/40-

    Thanks for the email,
    Shane

    #4283

    Ridge Brannon
    Keymaster

    Are you able to turn the speed of your rotisserie motor down? I roast about 50rpm and usually roast 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 pounds at a time. Depending on the bean and where it is from makes a difference too. Some beans are fast roasters others are slow. My Colombian and Costa Rican’s take 20 minutes to first crack at 550 – when I see the temp begin to rise as the exothermic reaction begins to happen with the bean. When first crack happens I start my timer (stopwatch) – when I hear 1st crack slow down and beginning to stop – I wait about a minute (sometimes I lower the heat a little) and listen very closely for the less loud but audible second crack to begin. I don’t like a French roast so I usually turn the heat off when I hear this begin and take my time emptying the drum because the residual heat allows it to continue cooking. The size of your load will change the time for roasting – but I suggest you keep a notebook with the type of bean and the time it took to get to first crack also noting the temp. Then learn to time it to second crack and note that.
    Keep your stopwatch nearby. Try also to pay attention to the aroma (the smell of the smoke) it will tell you if you are getting close to where you want to be with patience and experience.
    -Pamela Haddock

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